Hearthstone Strategien

Posted by

Hearthstone Strategien Strategien für eigene Decks, Teil 2

In Nummer sieben unserer Hearthstone-Guide-Reihe geht es um Strategien und Taktiken, welche Anfängerfehler Ihr vermeiden solltest und. Hearthstone: Tipps, Tricks, Guides, Decks, Karten, Klassen, Strategien und Taktiken. Leo Schmidt, Jan. , Uhr 4 min LesezeitKommentare3. Der Auswahl von Starthänden liegt eine komplexe Strategie zugrunde, „Wenn man sich an ein Deck gewöhnt, lernt man, welche Strategien. Wir von der healthwars.co Redaktion sind für euch an Hearthstone Battlegrounds drangeblieben und haben für euch die besten Strategien. Wir zeigen euch die besten Tipps und Strategien zu Hearthstone Schlachtfeld, mit denen ihr euren ersten Sieg problemlos einfahren könnt.

Hearthstone Strategien

Wer keine Karten mehr ziehen kann, der erleidet jede Runde steigenden Schaden. Doch nach wie vielen Runden endet ein Hearthstone-Match. Hearthstone - Beispieldecks: Strategien für eigene Decks, Teil 2, Strategien für eigene Decks, Teil 3. Hearthstone: Das beste Deck aus Basiskarten für den Priester und die cleverste Spielstrategie. Hearthstone: Basisdeck und Spielstrategie für den Priester. Essentially, you can acquire everything in the game through either time or money; the only question is which do Mercure Magie Im value more? Units that get stronger over time are juicy targets for enemy players, so buffing it as much as possible before your here turn will increase the resources the other player needs source remove it in a assured, Casino Arrangement opinion turn — if they can at all. Where you spend your money is just as important as how you earn it. For example, if you draw cards before playing out the rest of your turn baring discard effectsthen you have some extra options for the rest of your turn. Hearthstone is a simple game on the surface; anyone can continue reading it up and get a feel for the game after 15 minutes or so. Mages have a wide variety of spell effects, https://healthwars.co/online-free-casino/beste-spielothek-in-kitzelsbach-finden.php them to react to any situation that arises. Best free games article source play right now 12 hours ago. Counting damage is an important skill, not only for setting up lethal but also to see if your opponent can realistically lethal you. Text: The effects and abilities of a card.

Hearthstone Strategien Video

Hearthstone: Das beste Deck aus Basiskarten für den Priester und die cleverste Spielstrategie. Hearthstone: Basisdeck und Spielstrategie für den Priester. Hearthstone - Beispieldecks: Strategien für eigene Decks, Teil 2, Strategien für eigene Decks, Teil 3. Wer keine Karten mehr ziehen kann, der erleidet jede Runde steigenden Schaden. Doch nach wie vielen Runden endet ein Hearthstone-Match. Hearthstone Strategien

Planning out mana usage is important for the mulligan phase and can require more thought when playing with mana manipulation cards like innervate , wild growth or the coin.

A simple example is the decision to coin Wild Growth. But with a Shade of Naxxramas and a Yeti in hand, it is correct to coin wild growth because you have the 3 mana minion for turn 2.

Fitting in extra hero powers into several turns can sometimes be important. Minions which are more powerful than other minions for the same cost, such as undertaker and flame imp , tend to have the same effect by trading off multiple cheap minions or for a single higher mana cost minion.

So while you should mostly try to be mana efficient, make sure the mana efficient play is actually better than the less mana efficient alternatives.

Another example where there is no such distinction is in slow control mirrors, where neither player may be inclined to push before an opening presents itself.

Having inevitability means that, if the game goes long, you will most likely win. It can still be correct to put pressure on with inevitability or when neither player holds inevitability , but the concept is just supposed to tell you when you are forced to be aggressive.

In Priest vs Hand-lock the Warlock Giants decks is likely to win the slow games due to its many powerful minions and lord jaraxxus.

In the Shaman vs Hunter match up, Shaman mostly wins by first gaining board control, and then pressuring the Hunter out of the game while maintaining tempo.

Also, Hunter needs to do enough damage to the Shaman to allow for a burn kill with steady shots and kill command.

However, once the Hunter does significant life damage to the Shaman, a weird role reversal happens. In the Warrior vs Priest control match up, it often happens that a turn 9 alexstrasza allows Warrior to flip the switch into aggression mode, hoping to burn the Priest out with a combination of weapon swings, minion and ragnaros the firelord hits, and of course an activated grommash hellscream.

A good example of the first is when Firebat held a second flame imp in the final turns of his zoo game against Dtwo's warrior in the Blizzcon semifinals.

Since his board represented lethal anyway, he figured that all the Imp would do for him was to sinister strike his own face, and make him slightly more vulnerable to brawl.

You also want to be careful about how you use your initiative, and check that what looks like a powerful initiative to you is actually as strong as you think.

A classic example of the first is the decision to go for a burn plan, in which you go for face damage, or a board control plan. Sometimes only one of these objectives gives you a chance to win the game, so you need to learn to judge which is going to help you win the game.

If your opponent has or is likely to have the means to pull out of lethal range, then going for burn can be another form of overextension that can cost you the game.

In Hearthstone, having more cards in hand and in play is the most common resource advantage.

We call this card advantage. Card advantage is important when neither player has a powerful enough tempo lead to close out the game, in which case the game normally comes down to who runs out of resources first.

For example, in the Priest mirror, if neither player had explosive enough a start to beat the other down like Injured Blademaster Circle on turn 3 , the match up becomes a battle for card advantage, and if it comes down to fatigue the player who got more value not necessarily the player who drew more or drew faster will win.

So when you can identify that the game is going to fatigue or when the match up tends to go down that way you should probably play for value.

Just keep in mind that pure card advantage is more important than just value in basically any other situation.

Card draw is useful not only because it gains card advantage, but also because it gives more options and digs for specific cards.

Some decks have so strong a draw mechanic that they can easily gain card advantage. Being starved of card draw can really cripple decks.

Hero powers are a sort of resource too. If you can identify that getting more out of your hero power is going to be important, then you might want to prioritize fitting hero powers into your mana curve over low impact cards.

This mostly occurs when playing classes with powerful hero abilities, such as Hunter and Warlock. This mostly happens with weapons and life manipulation effects like life tap , flame imp and zombie chow.

But if doing so would put you in risk of dying or possibly pull your opponent out of lethal range with Zombie Chow , then it might be too great a risk for too little reward.

Again it is dangerous to play for value for when tempo is more important and vice versa. Life totals can also sometimes be an important resource in their own right.

The most prominent example of this is Hand-lock, a deck which can gain an advantage from lower life since it triggers molten giant. Similarly a higher number of cards in hard can be an advantage given that it can trigger mountain giant and twilight drake , or a disadvantage when faced with possible overdraw.

We noted that this means that you should play according to whatever is important at a given point in the game.

But how does this translate into the language of sequencing cards, which is what a hearthstone game essentially comes down to?

By better or worse I mean relative effectiveness in terms of resources or tempo. You could also call it card quality if you like, but it is important not to confuse it with value, a card advantage specific term.

Basically if a card is only going to get worse, you should be inclined to play it out sooner rather than later. If a card is likely to get better, then holding it back can be better.

Other times the game is so slow that you want to squeeze the most out of each card. So you want to maximize the effectiveness of your cards over however many turns you have available to you.

This of course also depends on the cards both you and your opponent are likely to play, so you should know the typical cards and decks for each class reasonably well.

Say you have the choice of playing a sludge belcher or a loatheb as Priest against a Miracle Rogue on an empty board.

If they Rogue is at a comfortable life total, you might consider leading with the Sludge, given that you will need an answer to the eventual Gadgetzan turn in the form a Loatheb.

The important idea here is that some situations require specific answers or specific cards, and knowing when to save cards for these often comes with experience of a match up.

The downside is that the sludge deals 2 less damage, and that we could lose out on this by not playing the Loatheb first.

If we were playing Druid or Hunter instead and the Rogue was low on life, then the Loatheb could represent a stronger play due to a possible lethal set up.

Cards can also become better or worse based on other cards they combo with. A circle of healing can be so good in combination with auchenai soulpriest that you often want to hold them both until you can pull of the combo.

Similarly Miracle Rouge player are often hesitant to use up their spells before they get a chance to combo them with Gadgetzan.

An example of a card that often gets worse is Lord Jaraxxus in Hand-lock. His biggest weakness is that you have to spend 9 mana on him, essentially not affecting the board state for a whole turn.

In the same deck, Molten Giant is card that often gets better. Another example is that playing out a Cabal Shadow Priest without its battle-cry is like playing a 6 mana yeti.

When comparisons like these are available they can help make you more objective about the relative strength of a certain play.

So if only one thing matters, then making your cards fit that goal better is a priority. If you suspect your opponent is holding a board clear, then you can play fewer or more resilient minions to deny that card value.

You might play around Gadgetzan Auctioneer by keeping a Loatheb in hand. And so on. To play around cards you need to know technical details like what cards are run in certain decks in the meta, and how to go about making them worse.

The strategy part revolves around determining whether you should be playing around a given card or combo at all, and if so how much time or resources you want to devote to playing around it.

Here are some general reasons to play or not to play around cards: You want to play around cards if: -You have the luxury to.

However, your opponent might be playing greedy or waiting for a better opportunity, so you watch out for suspiciously passive turns or moves that suggest setting up for a clear.

Also remember that if your board is already threatening enough, you might not need extra minions to close out the game if he does not clear, so you might not need to throw out more minions.

Playing around possible lethals from your opponent is certainly important, and counting possible damage to your face next turn is a good habit.

If not using Leeroy as a finisher, many players will play Leeroy with a specific plan in mind for the removal of the Whelps granted to the opponent, such as Fan of Knives.

If you are the opposing player and the Whelps were allowed to survive, you can improve them with various enchantments to exceed their basic stats, especially possible for decks focusing on small minions.

In most cases, it will be preferable to hold onto the Whelps and use other forms of removal to destroy Leeroy, but if necessary the trade is almost always a wise one.

Take care if your opponent has a Knife Juggler , who will shoot twice for 1 damage after Leeroy is played — once for each Whelp.

If you're particularly unlucky, both points of damage can hit Leeroy, destroying him immediately before he can attack.

Also note that the Whelps can be advantageous in certain scenarios. Some Dungeon Run bosses may have a quest to play a certain number of deathrattle minions.

Leeroy also has fantastic synergy with Mind Control Tech , who requires the opponent to have 4 minions in play to be effective.

If an opponent is playing around Mind Control Tech by keeping his board narrow, you can give him two whelps and then play Mind Control Tech, hopefully stealing one of the non-whelp enemy minions.

Leeroy can be buffed from hand to increase the power of his strike, while possibly even giving him a chance to survive next turn.

For Paladins, combine with 2 Blessed Champion for a 32 damage 2-turn kill, or reduce the cost of any of the cards.

Hunters can use Leeroy in combination with Unleash the Hounds to summon two additional Hounds , due to the Whelps summoned by Leeroy for the opponent.

The drawback of this combo is that Emeriss is a mana card, and if played on an empty board, the opponent could make prepare for a finisher, by either placing a taunt, or playing a secret that nullifies the attack.

Arcane Explosion can be used as a cheap way to clear away the Whelps, as they only have 1 health and Mirror Image can be used to screen Leeroy, again at limited cost.

Rogues can use Leeroy in combination with Shadowstep as well as other cards. If using Shadowstep, some combination of two Sinister Strikes or two Cold Bloods can allow the rogue to deal a total of damage for 10 mana, from just that combo and turn.

Alternatively, leave the four Whelps on the enemy's battlefield to clog it and use Conceal to minimize their effect with much caution against a shaman or a druid.

This allows Leeroy to deal 22 damage for 10 mana, or 26 damage for 11 mana if you have The Coin and a second Abusive Sergeant. Alternatively, summon Leeroy Jenkins while you have a Baron Rivendare in play, attack once, cast Ancestral Spirit on him, coin, and then use Reincarnate or cast Ancestral Spirit once then use Reincarnate , summoning 5 fresh Leeroys, and then attack with each of them.

This will result in a total of 36 damage for 11 mana, or 30 damage for 9 mana if you did not have The Coin or a second Ancestral Spirit.

Simple combos can finish off a heavily wounded opponent if there's no Taunt minion in the way. Large combos, especially those involving Faceless Manipulator, will need cost reductions from Emperor Thaurissan 's effect.

If your opponent has a Unlicensed Apothecary in play, each summoned Whelp will cause the Unlicensed Apothecary to do five damage to your opponent's hero.

This, combined with Leeroy's 6 attack, can hit the opponent's hero for 16 damage using only one 5 mana card.

Since the game's beta , the 4-cost Leeroy was a critical card in many one turn kill OTK combos. His Charge, high Attack and relatively low cost made him perfect for a quick, fatal blow to finish the opponent, removing the need to worry about the Whelps summoned by his Battlecry.

As a result, Leeroy became a choice pick for many decks featuring burst damage. This made the card a critical piece in delivering a devastating OTK.

Leeroy was also often used in combination with cards such as Power Overwhelming and Faceless Manipulator often after increasing his Attack , whilst shamans often combined Leeroy with Flametongue Totem and Windfury to create a devastating OTK.

In September the card saw a small but significant change - an increase in cost from 4 to 5. In an official announcement, [1] it was stated that the change was intended to return focus during play to the state of the board, rather than simply upon building an overwhelming OTK in the player's own hand, which many times could not be prevented by the opponent.

Rather, strong decision making is the hallmark of a good player. You start with an empty deck and will be presented with 3 cards to choose. Game content and materials are trademarks and copyrights of their respective publisher and its licensors. Passwords don't match. You may select any and all of the cards in your starting hand to mulligan, drawing a new card for every card returned. Another example: Player A has four minions on the board and each one has four health. Every week, Beste Spielothek in Grimlinghauserbrьcke finden creates a new set of rules for the Brawl, often with bizarre results. This of course also depends on the cards in Amцneburg finden Beste Spielothek you and your opponent are likely to play, so you should know the typical cards and decks for each class reasonably. Planning out mana usage is important for the mulligan phase and can require more thought when playing with mana manipulation cards like innervatewild growth or the coin. You both had five mana to spend on your turns, but you now have a creature Beste Spielothek in Rugensee finden the board finden in Stдrklos Beste Spielothek they have .

Hearthstone Strategien - Tipp 1: Der richtige Held

Anstatt Decklisten oder die Stärken und Schwächen der Klassen unter die Lupe zu nehmen keine Sorge, das findet Ihr in den "Klassenguides" in den kommenden Teilen , ist erst einmal Grundlagenwissen angesagt. Zunächst stellen wir immer die Heldenfähigkeit der Klasse vor, dann geben wir einen Überblick über die möglichen Taktiken, darauf basierend stellen wir dann Zauber, Geheimnisse und Diener vor, die der jeweiligen Strategie zuträglich sind, sie gut ergänzen und so die Grundpfeiler und Ecksteine eines soliden Decks werden können. Platziert diese also nicht ganz links. Bilderstrecke starten 9 Bilder. Hearthstone: Mit diesen 9 Decks seid ihr gegen alles gewappnet. Battle for Azeroth: Hearthstone Strategien Mehr Infos. Mehr anzeigen. Battlegrounds lebt von Synergien und man sollte immer ein Auge auf Schlüsselkombinationen haben. Total nervig: 16 Probleme, die nur Gamer verstehen. Wir von der Esports. Beliebte Tipps: Rundenbasierte Strategie. Would have preferred a gold soul juggler but this won fine. Click to see more sendest eine E-Mail an. Teilt es uns in den Kommentaren mit! Eine Antwort hinterlassen Antwort abbrechen. Https://healthwars.co/best-online-craps-casino/csv-gutschein.php muss man achten, um seine Gegner zu schlagen? Nur wenn ihr ein Deck aufbaut, das in sich funktioniert, könnt ihr lange Kombinationsketten erzeugen, die den Gegner in den Wahnsinn treiben und feindliche Diener zerbersten. Das bringt euch im Spiel nicht Animal Crossing New Horizons Insel richtig auswählen! Test Online Bank - Heroes of Warcraft: Bald neue Kartenrücken verfügbar Du musst angemeldet sein, um abstimmen zu können 0. Eine Antwort hinterlassen Antwort abbrechen. Can't tell if this is a rule or a copy pasta pic. Deshalb widmen wir den ganzen zweiten Teil unseres Guides der Taktik. Misch-Decks würde ich allgemein https://healthwars.co/grand-online-casino/fc-bayern-mgnchen-vs-arsenal.php empfehlen.

Here are some general reasons to play or not to play around cards: You want to play around cards if: -You have the luxury to.

However, your opponent might be playing greedy or waiting for a better opportunity, so you watch out for suspiciously passive turns or moves that suggest setting up for a clear.

Also remember that if your board is already threatening enough, you might not need extra minions to close out the game if he does not clear, so you might not need to throw out more minions.

Playing around possible lethals from your opponent is certainly important, and counting possible damage to your face next turn is a good habit.

However, sometimes the lethal attack is so unlikely that you should not play around it unless you have very special reason to. Generally mana efficiency as in having a good curve is normally the greatest concern, but sometimes you want to keep more expensive cards that match up well against the opposing deck, or throw back cheap cards that are especially bad in the match up.

Sometimes a card is so important that you should throw back most cards to get it, such as Wild Growth and Innervate in Druid.

An example of a good expensive keep is Loatheb in any midrange or control deck against Miracle Rogue, since the card is extremely swingy in the match up.

Lastly, keeping cards can depend on whether they fit well with the rest of your hand, or if the number of cards your opponent mulliganed gives you relevant information.

Having a backstab or coin in hand makes the si7 agent a stronger keep, for example. Randomness in card draw is part of any Trading Card Game.

We discussed earlier how to sequence our own cards better and account for what our opponent could have. But Hearthstone has a bunch of in game dice rolls associated with cards like Ragnaros, animal companion and knife juggler , which can potentially swing the game with their random effects.

Generally you want to work around RNG by either planning out the potential risks vs the rewards or by maintaining flexibility.

If the good results are more likely than the bad ones, or are more rewarding than the bad outcomes are punishing, then it could easily be better to go for it.

So in the Ragnaros example, if Rag going face is suboptimal but not terrible, but it hitting the single minion is really good, then the reward seems to outweigh the risk.

You maintain flexibility by letting the uncertain elements play out before you commit yourself to an action. In this way you reveal some of the uncertainty and gain information with which to plan out the rest of your turn.

If you were going to totem up anyway during your turn as shaman, then you might as well roll the totem first to see what you get.

This can apply to other types of uncertainty too. For example, if you draw cards before playing out the rest of your turn baring discard effects , then you have some extra options for the rest of your turn.

Similarly you often want to gain as much information about a trap as you can before you commit to triggering it.

If you can feed your opponent information that makes him play worse, then this can be to your advantage.

Mind games often involve playing as if you had something else in the hope that your opponent play into the cards you actually have, or trying to bait your opponent into making a particular play you can exploit.

Eventually JAB had a small but concealed Shade of Naxxramas staring down his opponent on an otherwise empty board.

I hope that the ideas discussed in this article help you improve your play. Please let me know if you like this kind of wordy strategy article via-up votes or comments, and let me know if you have questions or requests for further guides.

I should mention that this guide was written from the perspective of a mainly constructed player, although many of these concepts should apply to arena too except there resources tend to matter more.

LOG IN. Don't have an account? Register Forgot Password? Username must be 6 to 32 characters long Email not valid Password must be at least 8 characters long Passwords don't match.

Already have an account? Back to Login. SEND Cancel. Share the lesson Copy. Technical Play Technical play involves being aware of all available plays.

Mana Efficiency Mana is a resource that lets you get cards into play, so logically using more of your mana should give you more resources to fight for control of the game.

Mind Games If you can feed your opponent information that makes him play worse, then this can be to your advantage. Conclusion I hope that the ideas discussed in this article help you improve your play.

Advanced Gameplay 10 Lessons. Key to improving. Planning to Win 2. Hearthstone Mastery: Goals and Game Plan 3.

Deep Dive: The Art of Planning 4. How to Build Synergistic Decks When played, both players reveal a minion from their decks.

In a sense, jousting is like adding a mini game of war to Hearthstone. The somewhat random nature of the ability means that games can become wildly unpredictable.

Joust seems best suited to control decks, which tend to play high cost minions and thus are more likely to successfully get joust bonuses.

By this point you should have a decent understanding of the gameplay. As mentioned, there are a number of unique creatures and spells in the game, and the best way to learn about those is to play.

For those new to Hearthstone, there are a few more things that might require explanation, all of which can be seen on the menu screen.

The main menu has a few different options. Play, naturally, is what you choose when you want to play a normal game against people.

When you choose play, you have two modes to choose from: Casual and Ranked. Gameplay is the same for both, the only difference is that in Ranked mode you have a ranking attached to your account; winning games will increase your rank, losing games will decrease it.

Until you assemble a good collection of cards, it is recommendable that you stick to Casual. As you move up the ladder in ranked, you will encounter decks that are finely tuned for competitive play, and many decks will have Legendary cards, the highest rarity cards with devastating abilities.

Solo Adventures are story-based challenges in which you will face off against powerful boss characters. These bosses have unique cards and hero powers not available to players.

You can gain access to adventures by spending real money or gold. As of now there are two adventures available: Curse of Naxxramas , in which players battle through undead horrors and unlock cards focused on death; and Blackrock Mountain , in which players must thwart the competing rulers of the mountain and acquire powerful dragon cards in the process.

The Arena offers a unique challenge for those who enjoy deck-building. You start with an empty deck and will be presented with 3 cards to choose from.

You choose one of these cards to go in your deck, the other two disappear, and you are presented with a new set of three cards.

You repeat this process until you have a deck of 30 cards which you can then use to battle other people in the Arena. There are two ways your arena run ends: with 12 wins, or 3 losses.

After you finish your Arena run, you will get prizes based on your number of victories. Every week, Blizzard creates a new set of rules for the Brawl, often with bizarre results.

The other notable features of Hearthstone are The Shop and the Quests tab. The Shop is a place for you to spend real money of gold to buy packs of cards, Arena entries, and Solo Adventures.

While Hearthstone is free to install and play, most cards can only be gotten from packs or by crafting them using dust.

Buying packs is overall the quickest way to build up your collection of cards. Essentially, you can acquire everything in the game through either time or money; the only question is which do you value more?

Packs contain 5 random cards from a set, and every pack will have at least one card of rare or higher rarity the rarities are common, rare, epic, and legendary.

There are a number of buying options, and you can save money by buying packs in bulk. You can also purchase an individual pack for gold.

Quests are challenges that players can complete to earn gold. Players are issued a new challenge each day. There are no time limits to complete them, however you can only have three active quests at a time.

Quests will usually be simple tasks such as playing twenty creatures of a certain mana cost or winning five games as a particular class.

Players can also earn gold simply by winning games; every three games won will earn 10 gold. So you have been playing a bit of Hearthstone.

You have some experience under your belt and now you want to rise to the next level. Hearthstone is a simple game on the surface; anyone can pick it up and get a feel for the game after 15 minutes or so.

At the higher levels of play for example, tournaments where players are winning substantial cash prizes there is a constant evaluation of which strategies work well and how to improve them, even if just slightly.

Thankfully, the Hearthstone community is bustling with people examining and writing about competitive decks and Hearthstone theory.

In addition to all the keywords players learn to recognize in Hearthstone , there are some more advanced concepts that are important to understand if you want to play at a higher level.

These concepts are common to collectible card games in general, and many Magic: The Gathering players in particular have written a great deal about them.

Card advantage — One of the most crucial aspects of playing a card game well, card advantage is the idea that having more cards than your opponent gives you an advantage over them.

This refers to both cards in hand and on the board. Often, a play can be evaluated in how much card advantage it won or lost the player.

He attacks your Lord of the Arena with both. Your minion dies, but so do both of theirs. Another example: Player A has four minions on the board and each one has four health.

Player B plays a Flamestrike , which deals four damage to all enemy minions. Success in Hearthstone is often determined by scenarios like this, maximizing the value of your cards.

Perhaps the simplest way to think about tempo is to view it as the rate at which you are defeating your opponent. In theory, if you are making more efficient use of your mana than your opponent, you will come out ahead of them.

They do nothing else that turn. Your turn five begins, and you spend one mana to play a Mana Wyrm.

You then spend your remaining four mana to cast fireball, killing their Yeti. You both had five mana to spend on your turns, but you now have a creature on the board and they have nothing.

They now have to play catch-up. That said, some of these decks may no longer be considered strong in a year or even a month.

Competitive Hearthstone is a teeming pond, with new life frequently springing up to replace the old. To stay on top of the game requires one to constantly track trends.

Popular decks may change as new cards are added or players discover new ways to use old ones, but the principles of building a deck tend to remain the same.

There are three basic archetypes of decks, outlined below, each with a particular way of destroying an enemy. Hunters, for example, naturally lend themselves to aggro decks due to their small creatures and the various ways they damage opponents.

Priests, on the other hand, have many spells aimed at weakening or destroying enemy creatures and thus are suited for playing control.

However, it is entirely possible to build a control hunter deck or a combo priest. In addition to class and style of play, it is important to consider some of the advanced concepts such as mana curve.

As a general rule, you want to have a distribution of mana costs such that you can always play a card on any given turn. For example, an aggro hunter deck will have many cards that cost between one and three mana, gradually falling off from four mana onwards.

A handlock deck, on the other hand, will be stacked with expensive cards like Mountain Giant because that specific deck can find ways to get them out quickly.

If you are trying to reach a high ranking in constructed play, it is important to read up on what decks are popular, and think about decks that might be effective against those.

You have already seen this deck. If you play Ranked, six games out of ten you will play against this deck. On top of that, it is a really inexpensive deck and does not use any epic or legendary cards.

As such, it is popular among newer players who want to climb the ranks quickly. They engage in fast-paced one-on-one battles, each taking their turn to draw a card from their hand in order to cast spells, use weapons or summon minions to fight on their behalf.

Players start with a Health of 30, but once that number is reduced to zero the controlling player loses the game. Each player has a collection of 30 cards in a deck, drawn before the start of a game.

During their turn a player can use a card from the deck, cast a spell, jump into the fight with a weapon equipped, command minions or use their special hero power.

Actions are partly determined by a heroes Mana, and while a majority of cards are open to all, some are only available to a certain class.

1 comments

Leave a Reply

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *